For Parents

Resources for Parents

Does your child seem uncharacteristically frustrated? Does your son or daughter seem withdrawn and unwilling to communicate? Adolescence can be a tough time, especially for children who do not know how to recognize their emotions and channel them properly. Luckily, Frameworks can help.


What is SEL?

parent-selMost children fitting the above descriptions will benefit from social and emotional learning (SEL). SEL is a framework that refers to the acquisition of skills needed to recognize and manage emotions, develop care and concern for others, make responsible decisions, establish and maintain positive relationships, and handle interpersonal situations effectively. Parents and family members are the first place that children learn about themselves and how others will react to their feelings. Providing a safe environment for children to express emotions in a healthy manner is a significant way that parents can contribute to supporting their child’s social and emotional growth.

The simplest way to teach your children about social and emotional skills is to set a good example. It is important to talk to your child about their emotions and how they feel each day. The key is to listen and encourage conversation. To engage your child, ask for help with activities around the house, like folding laundry or cooking dinner. These activities will not only teach them responsibility, but also provide opportunities for conversation and teamwork. It may also be beneficial to limit your child’s screen time and encourage them find a non-digital activity that helps them express their creativity and emotion, like art, music, or sports. For more ideas on stimulating SEL, click here.

Although it is recommended to incorporate social and emotional learning skills as early as age 4, it is never too late to start learning! Social and emotional learning will help prepare children for success in the areas of self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationships, and responsible decision-making. Reference the links below for additional information on SEL and specific resources for each age. 


The C​enter on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning

The C​enter on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL)​has developed extensive video and print resources which are available directly from this website to help foster social emotional skills.

http://csefel.vanderbilt.edu/index.html

National School Climate Center

The article by the National School Climate Center stresses the importance of creating a positive home environment allowing them to be more confident learners throughout their life.

h​ttp://www.schoolclimate.org/parents/safeHome.php

Parent Toolkit

This is a great online resource for parents of children in grades K­12, as you support your children through their academic experience.

http://www.parenttoolkit.com/index.cfm?objectid=50A8EC10-32D8-11E4-B03B0050569A5318

NASP Online

This website includes activities and tips for you to implement to build a foundation of gratitude for your child.

http://www.nasponline.org/research-and-policy/advocacy-tools-and-resources/school-psychology-awareness-week-2015/gratitude-works-program

National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families: Zero to Three

This website is great for parents as it speaks to the social and emotional development of children under three.

https://www.zerotothree.org/policy-and-advocacy/social-and-emotional-health

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